creating footnotes in WordPress

Using footnotes when you write is a quick and easy way of giving credit to the source document that you have referenced. Unfortunately WordPress (and most other blogging platforms) do not seem to provide an built in method of adding footnotes although there are WordPress plugins that do the job.

One option is to just code the footnote yourself using html.

footnotes in html

this is what footnotes look like in the browser:

William Shakespeare was the son of John Shakespeare, an alderman and a successful glover originally from Snitterfield, and Mary Arden, the daughter of an affluent landowning farmer [1]. He was born in Stratford-upon-Avon and baptised there on 26 April 1564. His actual date of birth remains unknown, but is traditionally observed on 23 April, Saint George’s Day [2]. This date, which can be traced back to an 18th-century scholar’s mistake, has proved appealing to biographers, since Shakespeare died 23 April 1616[3]. He was the third child of eight and the eldest surviving son [4].


1. Text of footnote 1
2. Text of footnote 2
3. Text of footnote 3
4. Text of footnote 4

and this is what is looks like when coded in HTML:
William Shakespeare was the son of John Shakespeare, an alderman and a successful glover originally from Snitterfield, and Mary Arden, the daughter of an affluent landowning farmer <sup><a id="ref1" href="#fn1">[1]</a></sup>. He was born in Stratford-upon-Avon and baptised there on 26 April 1564. His actual date of birth remains unknown, but is traditionally observed on 23 April, Saint George's Day <sup><a id="ref2" href="#fn2">[2]</a></sup>. This date, which can be traced back to an 18th-century scholar's mistake, has proved appealing to biographers, since Shakespeare died 23 April 1616<sup><a id="ref3" href="#fn3">[3]</a></sup>. He was the third child of eight and the eldest surviving son <sup><a id="ref4" href="#fn4">[4].
1. Text of footnote 1<a title="Jump back to footnote 1 in the text." href="#ref1">&#8617;</a>
2. Text of footnote 2<a title="Jump back to footnote 2 in the text." href="#ref2">&#8617;</a>
3. Text of footnote 3<a title="Jump back to footnote 3 in the text." href="#ref3">&#8617;</a>
4. Text of footnote 4<a title="Jump back to footnote 4 in the text." href="#ref4">&#8617;</a>

footnotes best practice

For a proper footnote, the number (or letter) should be in superscript. For it to scroll to the bottom, where the note is, it needs to be a link. The note at the bottom should also have a link back to the noted text in the body of the work. Here are the tags used, and their purpose (Remember to close the tags by using “/” in the same tag you open with.):

<sup> makes text in superscript.
<a href=”fn1″> creates a link to wherever you put id=”fn1″.
<a href=”#ref1″>↩</a> makes a link back to the reference number, in this case, the first footnote. Wherever id=”ref1″ is, this will create a link to it.
title=”Jump back to footnote 4 in the text.” creates a tip that says the text in the quotes when the user’s mouse hovers over the link.
[The icon ↩ is witten as &#8617; in html.]

footnote plugins

Another option is to use a WordPress plugin and I will cover that in another post.

i’ll teach my dog 100 words

I’ll Teach My Dog 100 Words

By Michael Frith illustrated by P.D. Eastman

I’ll teach my dog 100 words.
The first six words I’ll teach my pup are … dig a hole! And fill it up!
I’ll teach him … walk and run, and then catch a ball.
Now that makes ten.
And Mr Smith who lives next door, will say, “That’s great! Can you teach him more?”
And then I’ll teach him … bark and beg and wag your tail and shake a leg … and wash your toes and scratch your head and blow your nose.
Then Mr. smith will tell Miss Brown, “This is the smartest dog in town!”
I won’t stop there. No, not at all … I’ll teach him big, I’ll teach him small … and fat and thin and short and tall … and dark … and light … and day … and night.
And then Miss Brown will call Miss May. “Come over right away,” she’ll say.
“This dog is learning chase the cat and climb the tree and things like that!”
Then we will give them more to see … eat your food and follow me.
Wow! We’re up to forty-three.
I’ll teach him RED and BLUE and GREEN.
“This is the smartest dog we’ve ever seen!”
I’ll teach him ORANGE PURPLE PINK.
That makes forty-nine, I think.
And then Miss May will call Mayor Meer. She’ll call, “Please come over here!”
And then for Mr. Meer, the Mayor, I’ll teach my dog … now paint the chair.
Paint the road from here to there.
Paint uncle Abner’s underwear …
But have a care! Don’t paint the Mayor!
Then Mr. Meer the Mayor will say, “I’ll make today a holiday!”
And everyone will come to see my amazing dog and me.
We’ll show then skate and kick the stone!
Jump the fishbowl!
Bring the bone!
Chew the boot, and hold the phone!
Cut the grass!
Shine my shoe!
Comb your hair!
And clean the zoo!
Now brush the bear!
That’s eighty-two.
But that’s not all my dog will do.
He’ll tickle the pig, and kiss the goose!
He’ll feed the mouse and mop the moose!
He’ll toot a bugle … beat a drum.
He’ll stand on uncle Abner’s thumb.
And then I’ll teach him sing with birds.
Now, THERE! That makes 100 words.
My dog will learn those hundred words – and how my friends will cheer!
I’ll teach my dog those hundred words … I think I’ll start next year.